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The Football Coaching Podcast with Joe Daniel

Coach Joe Daniel from JoeDanielFootball.com helps you build a better football team at any level. Youth Football Coaches, Middle School Football Coaches, High School Football Coaches, College Football Coaches and Semi-Professional Football Coaches will get great ideas and discussion from The Football Coaching Podcast.
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The Football Coaching Podcast with Joe Daniel
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Now displaying: July, 2020
Jul 30, 2020

Coach Tim Snow wasn't thinking about spread formations when he first started studying the Pistol Power Offense System in 2015. That first version of the system looked a lot more like the traditional One Back Offense that I first learned from Coach Bill Mountjoy years ago.

But the great thing about the System is that it evolves. And as Coach Snow and the Winnisquam High School offense evolved in New Hampshire, so did their offensive playbook. The version of the playbook that won back to back New Hampshire State Championships in 2018 and 2019 uses a lot more wide open spread formations. But it keeps the same core principles and schemes.

Scroll down to listen to this episode of The Football Coaching Podcast and my interview with Coach Snow on the use of spread formations in the Pistol Power Offense System.

Versatility of the System

Coach Snow credits the versatility of the Pistol Power Offense System with helping his offense evolve to fit the players. Each season, the Winnisquam staff takes a look at what his athletes can do. Then they build the playbook around that, while keeping the core teachings.

After using a bruising rushing attack for 3 seasons, the talent the small New England school changed. It was time for a wide open attack. Starting in 2018, Coach Snow incorporated spread formations, the read option, and an expanded passing attack. That took Winnisquam to their first State Championship.

The following season, the offense continued to evolve. RPOs were added to open up the playbook for an athletic Quarterback who's understanding of how to read a defense continued to improve. Winnisquam rode that development all the way to a second State Championship in 2019.

They'll look to defend the Championship and three-peat (do I owe someone money for that?) in 2020.

Play Calling with Spread Formations

It's not just about the playbook. Coaches have to know how to choose what to use from the playbook. It's not just about spread formations. It's knowing what your athletes can handle, and what they can do best.

Season to season, you're selecting the plays and formations that define your identity. You need to adapt to the style that fits your athletes best. You also need to game plan each week for how you're going to attack the opponent.

Then you're looking at how to call the plays during the game. Play selection throughout the game determines the outcome much more than the game planning you do on the weekends. The Winnisquam offense has that down, scoring three times as many points in the second half as they did in the first half during 2019.

Listen to this episode of The Football Coaching Podcast to find out the simple process Coach Snow uses to determine play selection. Tim shares exactly what he looks for to determine how his team will attack their opponents during the game.

This is a great look at how the Pistol Power Offense is a lot more than just running the ball, or even lining up in pistol! Check it out using the player below, or search for The Football Coaching Podcast wherever you listen to podcasts!

Jul 23, 2020

Every coach has been trying to figure out just what's going to happen with the 2020 football season. From state to state there seems to be just as much uncertainty today as there was 3 months ago.

This week's episode of The Football Coaching Podcast takes a look at the questions your coaching staff needs to address to get ready. This is not about what's going to happen. None of us really know what is going to happen with COVID-19. It's actually about preparing your football program for what could happen this season.

 

What Could Happen This Season?

There are multiple possibilities. Things could turn out pretty good (at least from a football standpoint). It could turn out very bad. This is not about any scientific or political beliefs you hold personally. It's about being prepared for very real possibilities.

From state to state, we will all be dealing with different situations. We've already seen different plans within the same state, like California and Texas. To keep track of what's happening around the country, there's a state-by-state look here.

Possibilities for the 2020 Football Season

Many states are still on track to start on time, or within a week to two weeks of the planned starting time. None of that is official until teams actually start stepping onto the field. But even for those coaches that are getting back to practice as expected, there are a lot of issues to plan for. This episode addresses the issues you need to expect in the 2020 football season even when starting on time.

Then there are states with a longer delay planned. Anywhere from one to two months. Several of those plans include shortened seasons. You're already dealing with a shortened off-season as well. How much do you need to simplify your playbooks?

Other states have looked at flipping some spring sports with the fall season sports, or moving football entirely to the spring this year. Those longer delays can open up a whole new can of worms - like totally flipping the weather dynamic. Is it better to play in 100 degree weather when you're just starting, or fatigued from the season? I don't know that answer.

And then there's the elephant in the room. What about a situation where you don't even have a 2020 football season? Not in 2020. Not in Spring 2021. Not at all. Scary, but a very real situation. One that Spring 2020 sports already had to face.

Prepare for Adversity This Year

There's a lot of questions. This episode doesn't even touch on all the possible questions that could be asked. I'll be working with our JDFB Coaching Systems clients to get better insight on the big issues each scenario causes through the next 6 months or more.

One thing is sure. Teams that are prepared for the adversity of the 2020 football season are going to fare better than the teams that are not. There are opportunities for your program to get ahead despite all the uncertainty that has been caused by COVID-19 this year. Check out this episode for some of the steps your program can take to find those opportunities.

Jul 16, 2020

Coaching defensive line technique for young players can be frustrating. There's a world of bad habits and natural instincts you've got to break.

During Season 7 of The Football Coaching Podcast we've looked at how to use some of the core principles from JDFB Coaching Systems to solve problems. Those core principles include shows on coaching using ASKA and pulling levers for constant improvement.

Now it's time to apply those concepts to defensive line technique and solve those problems we see all the time with young defensive linemen learning the position.

Top 5 Defensive Line Technique Issues

Football is a complicated game. With JDFB I'm always working to simplify it for coaches. That will simplify the game for players. We're focusing on 5 big technique issues that Defensive Linemen at the High School level often have.

1. Staying Low: Every defensive line coach knows this one. We're constantly screaming about pad level. Low man wins! There's some critical levers to pull with your ASKA to solve this one. Honestly, if you can fix this problem your defensive line is going to be significantly better regardless of what else you manage to improve.
2. Eyes in the Backfield: You know that look. When you've got a defensive lineman trying to look over the shoulder of his blocker. That's not a good thing. Let's fix that technique issue too.
3. Getting Trap Blocked: Seems simple. Don't get up the field. But the levers you need to pull to solve that problem are a lot more complex. Kind of like telling a wide receiver to just CATCH THE BALL! We'll pull the levers to solve this defensive line technique problem.
4. Staying Blocked: The ability to get off blocks is critical for defensive linemen. They need to use active hands to get off the block. We'll look at some drills and coaching cues to make this happen.
5. Losing Quarterback Contain: It's not the top-of-mind issue for coaches. But this is a defensive line killer. Losing contain on an athletic quarterback when you have great coverage is a disaster. It often extends the drive for an otherwise sputtering offense. Find out how to solve this issue when you listen to the podcast.

Constant Improvement

Using the ASKA principle and the Levers method gets constant improvement for your defensive line technique. Follow the concepts that I'll talk about in this episode and apply them to any position on your football team if you want to keep getting better all season long.

This episode of The Football Coaching Podcast uses critical elements of JDFB Coaching Systems. You don't need to run every front, every coverage that we teach to get the most out of our systems. They are a framework for your football team to maximize the performance of your football players.

Click here to find out more about JDFB Coaching Systems and get instant access to 5 Complete Coaching Systems and all of the resources JDFB clients enjoy.

Jul 9, 2020

You can argue if it's the best, but the power blocking scheme is definitely one of the most used running plays in football today. On this episode of The Football Coaching Podcast, we're doing a deep dive into all the details of this great gap blocking scheme attack.

Gap Blocking vs. Zone Blocking

I'm biased. Power is a core run play in The Pistol Power Offense System. But the other primary blocking scheme is the zone run game. So we get started with a discussion about Gap Blocking vs Zone Blocking schemes.

Inside Zone and Outside Zone runs are like pattern matching on defense. That means they take whatever you do on the other side of the ball and use it against you. There's nothing soft about zone blocking. But there is a somewhat passive nature about zone blocking. We're letting you make the decision on how we're going to beat you.

With the Power blocking scheme, it's the opposite. This is a gap blocking play. The offensive line is going to create a seam where we want it, when we want it. Gap blocking schemes like Power use angles and numbers to create an advantage and open the hole whether you want us to do it or not!

Blocks for Running Power

Now that we've established the difference in gap schemes vs zone schemes, it's time to work through the rules of the Power blocking scheme. It starts with identifying the different types of blocks your players need to execute.

Down blocking is critical in any gap scheme play. Power is no different. Base blocks aren't used very often, but we'll talk about them too. The combo is the other major feature of the power blocking scheme - a double team at the point of attack against most defensive fronts. That's where you force the issue to create your run lane.

Of course you have the other two notable features of a power run play. The kickout block on the defensive end, and wrapping the back side Guard to block the play side Linebacker. There's intricate details of angle and footwork you've got to teach to get the most of out your play. Those details are also in the podcast.

Power Blocking Scheme Rules

And finally, you need a set of rules. When you're a Coach Simple, Play Fast, Win offensive coach you have to keep those rules in check. There can't be a lot of if-then situations.

I'm not going to blow your mind with the basics of Power. It's more about the little details. That's what makes this play work for absolutely any offensive attack. You use angles to create the running lane and get great at the play because you keep it simple.

Blocking Assignments for Power

  • If the Guard is covered, and Center uncovered combo between Guard and Tackle.
  • If the Guard is uncovered, combo between Tackle and Tight End.
  • If the Guard is covered and the Center is covered everybody down blocks.
  • Center always blocks back.
  • Tight End, if not in the combo, blocks the A Gap Area.
  • Back side Guard wraps to block the back side number of the play side Linebacker.
  • Back side Tackle hinges.
  • H-Back, Fullback, whoever your kick out guy is going to be based on formation - kicks out the man on or outside the Tight End. With no Tight End, it's the man on or outside the Tackle.

Flexibility of the Power Blocking Scheme

Finally, this podcast closes out with a look at how versatile the blocking scheme really is. This is not just one play. In fact, in the Pistol Power Offense System we built an entire series around it. Click here to get my free 3 video series on the Power Series!

Power Read. 'G' Power. 1-Back Power. Counter and Counter Trey. You can get a lot of mileage out of this one single gap blocking scheme. So invest in it!

Listen to this episode of The Football Coaching Podcast to get all the details on running the Power Blocking Scheme. Then subscribe so you don't miss great new episodes coming out every week.

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